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Thread: CO2 Safety

  1. #1

    CO2 Safety

    I figured I'd post this for those that care to learn a little more about CO2 safety. It's some very "dry" reading, but worth the few minutes to read it. While the dangers associated with the volumes of co2 that we use for our tanks are minimal, there are still some real dangers such as-
    Contains gas and liquid under pressure; may explode if heated. Can cause rapid suffocation.
    May cause dizziness and drowsiness.
    Can increase respiration and heart rate.
    May cause nervous system damage.
    May cause frostbite

    Have you ever seen a gas cylinder release 800psi or more all at once? I have and it's not cool at all. If you haven't already done so, secure your cylinder to a fixed object to help prevent accidentally knocking it over! Have you ever almost become asphyxiated from a large release of gas? I have and it totally wasn't cool at all. Transport the cylinder secured in a well ventilated vehicle! Have you ever been burnt by liquefied gas? I have and you guessed it, it was not cool (no pun in tended). Read the attached MSDS!

    http://www.praxair.com/~/media/Files...S%20P4574.ashx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,260
    Important thread and link to read for all pressurized CO2 users. Thanks for posting it. A lot of people don't think about the fact that they can be hurt or killed by pressurized co2 or by building regulators.
    Last edited by Matt F.; 05-08-2013 at 05:13 AM.

  3. #3
    Hey Matt! I appreciate your reply. I know that you understand the risks associated with the gas and gas apparatus that most of us planted aquarium folks use. My real life experiences that I mentioned are, well, real life experiences. I've worked in the industrial, medical, specialty, bulk and micro bulk gas supply world for many years. The company that I work for has a world class safety record, but things can happen. Operational discipline is the key. You must ask yourself, what am I about to do, what are the risks, and how do I minimize the risks for myself and those around me... my coworkers, my wife, my dog? Seriously. I needed to mount my co2 cylinder outside of my aquarium cabinet due to a recent sump addition. My dog is "nosy" and started bumping my co2 cylinder with her nose. I immediately fashioned an anchor point to my aquarium cabinet for the co2 cylinder. You can now drop kick the cylinder and it's not going anywhere. Safety First!

  4. #4
    This is the nosy dog named Jolene.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,260
    Cut dog. Yeah, I know of someone who was thrown across a garage and slammed against a wall by a pressurized gas tank. He was a welder. Notice I said "was." I totally understand the need for safety.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Boca Raton, FL
    Posts
    172
    I get Co2 from a friend of mine who runs a local independent beer and soda equipment company.

    He warned me about riding in the car with a Co2 tank in the trunk, even with the valve closed tight.

    One time I was driving for about an hour with newly refilled tank in the car, and I started to get light headed and had a funny taste in my mouth and remembered what he said and opened all the windows for the rest of the time in the car.

    Now, when I have a tank in the car I always crack a window in the car while driving.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by gsjmia View Post
    I get Co2 from a friend of mine who runs a local independent beer and soda equipment company.

    He warned me about riding in the car with a Co2 tank in the trunk, even with the valve closed tight.

    One time I was driving for about an hour with newly refilled tank in the car, and I started to get light headed and had a funny taste in my mouth and remembered what he said and opened all the windows for the rest of the time in the car.

    Now, when I have a tank in the car I always crack a window in the car while driving.
    My bottles ride in the bed of the truck/covered in moist towels, tied down.

  8. #8
    I've been tempted to tie on the bed of the truck and use it like nitrous or to freak tailgaters out.
    But a small modification to the windshield wiper fluid sprayer took care of that

    I do the towel thing and open windows.
    Never had an issue.

    And that is the point of safety, you NEVER want to have an issue. Then it's too late.

    I cut meat for 11 years, I met many older Butchers with big egos claiming they were the greatest and they had a finger missing etc, or had them sewed back on......
    I'll gladly take the no# 2 headband for being the best.

  9. #9
    The gasman is right on. I know because I used to service fire extinguishers. A fellow aquarist once said: "they are just fire extinguishers". I reminded him that they are high pressure vessels and not something you want your guests or children to play with. I have my tank inside the cabinet and the cabinet doors have locks on them.
    Last edited by rjordan393; 05-12-2013 at 11:29 AM.

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