Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AM1000 reactor: plumbing question for the "false gas valve"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AM1000 reactor: plumbing question for the "false gas valve"

    Hi,

    I learned here efficiency of the AM1000 (or other reactors) can be enhanced by bringing the output of the "false gas valve" on the AM1000 (C02 bleed line) back to the intake of a main pump.

    #1
    One recommendation is to bring the output of the CO2 bleed valve to BEFORE the pump. So the CO2 bleed line would be connected in-line to the intake tube for the PUMP.

    #2
    A different recommendation is to bring the output of the CO2 bleed valve to AFTER the pump that feeds the AM1000. So the CO2 bleed liine would be connected in-line to the intake tube of the AM1000 (but again, after the pump).

    The first recommendation seems better so any excess CO2 gas will be chopped by pump impeller and then fed through reactor. But I want to go with the second option (my pump intake line is 1" and I don't want to cut into the 1" pump intake tube); it would be easier for me to bring the bleed line to 5/8" tubing which I use between the pump and AM1000.

    Any reason I should NOT go with my option 2, or is this fine.

    Thanks,

  • #2
    You need the impeller to chop up the CO2 into small bubbles, so connect the bleed valve to the pump intake. If you connect it after the pump, you will get big gas bubbles into your tank that won't get dissolved. It's just wasting gas that way.

    Regards,
    Dutchy
    regards,
    dutchy.

    My 2011, 2012 and 2013 AGA aquascaping contest entries:
    http://www.barrreport.com/album.php?u=21013

    Comment


    • #3
      dutchy, many thanks.

      Perhaps I was not clear. (since I don't see how my option2 would result in large co2 bubbles, if the the bleed valve is fed back to the AM1000 reactor input).

      My option2 is that the false gas valve (CO2 bleed) is returned to the intake tube of the AM1000 reactor. I have seen this recommended and implemented by others.

      Sequence:
      tank intake tube -->(tube1)-->pump-->(tube2)-->AM1000-->(tube3)-->tank return

      My option1 was to connect the AM1000 bleed valve to tube1.
      My option2 was to connect the AM1000 bleed valve to tube2.

      Why would option2 produce wasted gas? I'm trying to figure out if there is a reason not to do option2. I ask because option2 is the easiest given my tube sizes and the reducing Tees that I have.

      cheers & thanks,

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry if I don't understand, but if you bleed the gas out of the reactor just to get it in there again, without the use of the impeller the effect is zero IMO. I did option1 and it gives you a fair amount of misting. The little bubbles made by the impeller pass through the reactor easily. If you do option 2 you just create a loop, nothing more.

        regards,
        dutchy
        regards,
        dutchy.

        My 2011, 2012 and 2013 AGA aquascaping contest entries:
        http://www.barrreport.com/album.php?u=21013

        Comment


        • #5
          There is an Aqua Medic Reducing Tee - 21 mm x Airline Tube. This is about 13/16". Would this be close enough to 1" to work? http://www.marinedepot.com/Aqua_Medi...FICOPP-vi.html

          Something else, can you run your 'false gas' line from the reactor to the intake? Wouldn't that work? Maybe plumb the line into an intake slit if need be.
          Last edited by Left C; 02-10-2010, 04:34 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Left C (and dutchy), many thanks.

            Running CO2 bleed line to actual tank intake is good idea and alternative. I use ehiem installation kits for intake/output lines at tank edge. These have 'straight bits' that sit flat on the aquarium rim (i.e., are not continuous U shaped, so any input or output tube essentially goes through 2 90degree angles to get from tank to cannister). Relevance is that I would be concerned CO2 bleed gas, if it accumulated, would get trapped in the installation kit head and break siphon.

            http://www.marinedepot.com/filters_e...mation-ap.html


            Is is this a legitimate concern? I can use one of the reducing Tees for my main pump with its 1" intake tube, and I will if needed. I'm just trying to figure if that can be avoided.

            Cheers,

            Comment


            • #7
              Could you use a push-quick fitting mounted on the cap of your Eheim installation kit #1? You could put your bleed line through one of these. It would be easy to remove and put back too. Just drill a hole in the cap for it. Below are two different sizes to check out. Also, below this are many more.
              http://clippard.com/catalog/Page%20310.pdf
              6 mm tubing OD: PQ-BU06M: http://clippard.com/store/display_de...u=PQ-BU06M-BLK
              1/4" tubing OD: PQ-BU08: http://clippard.com/store/display_de...ku=PQ-BU08-BLK

              Clippard has about a zillion different designs and sizes. Maybe one of them would work for you. There's quick connect, barbed, and more. http://clippard.com/
              http://clippard.com/fittings/
              http://clippard.com/downloads/genera...and%20Hose.pdf

              Comment


              • #8
                option 1 is tom's "dual venturi external diy co2 reactor" (see sticky in articles section). as to the placement of the bleed line, i have mine going to the bottom of the intake tube of my closed loop, prior to the pump. i doubt that the bleed co2 line would break the siphon of your intake--it's really a mix of co2, other gases, and relevant to your concerns, water.

                Comment

                Working...
                X