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  • L. Aromatica

    My Aromatica has a real nice purple hue on the bottom of the leaves, but the tops stay green. Is that typical? I'd really like to see that color on top, but only get to when I prune.....

  • #2
    I get red colors on top on high light

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    • #3
      maybe I should plant them upside down

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      • #4
        I get really red colors on top with Giesemann T5's at 1.8 w/gal.

        Regards,
        Tom Barr
        www.BarrReport.com

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        • #5
          I get really red colors on top with Giesemann T5's at 1.8 w/gal.
          Yes I get very nice red tops and purple undersides with PAR values of 150 and up.

          MH 3x150 6500k.
          Thanks,

          Gerry.

          'When something's not right, it's wrong'. Bob Dylan

          Current 220 scape

          http://www.barrreport.com/showthread...3219-220-video

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          • #6
            I think, it also can be the light spectrum? if you have a good sourse of blue the plants gets red more fast and more pronounced

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            • #7
              I'm currently running 192W of 6700K PC and recently added 48W T5 HO (24W 10000K and 24W "freshwater pink", I think it's 6700K) on a 92G corner bow, good CO2 (no algae at least!) and lighter EI dosing. The PC's are about due for replacement (pushing 1 1/2 yr), maybe I'll make em all 10000K. Growth is good, just want to bring out color.

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              • #8
                this plant turns a bronzish/green color if the light is too high or nitrates are too low.

                gets red at about 2 wpg and below 1.5 or so for optimal color, keep everything else the same, co2 ferts etc...

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                • #9
                  I thought by low nitrate stress was intensifying the reds

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                  • #10
                    Hi,

                    I thought by low nitrate stress was intensifying the reds
                    IMO it is not a good thing to CREATE a deficiency simply to enhance color as I would have a concern that the plant may suffer in some other way. Wouldn't that violate Leibigs(?) min law and cause some issue?

                    I would like to mention that I am a topper/replanter with my aromatica and other stems so the same top is 'reused' for quite some time over several months. I have noticed that the color is more intense as the plant is older, bigger, and thicker as opposed to the first or second topping.

                    Since the same top is replanted several times, perhaps the maturity/size plays a role in color?

                    I have just replanted all NEW shoots and are almost ready for their FIRST topping so I will capture some pics now and at each cutting to see.

                    Later,
                    Thanks,

                    Gerry.

                    'When something's not right, it's wrong'. Bob Dylan

                    Current 220 scape

                    http://www.barrreport.com/showthread...3219-220-video

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Breakthru View Post
                      I thought by low nitrate stress was intensifying the reds
                      My plants did not read the poster who first stated that!
                      my plants don't go by the forums so they don't follow a lot of the rules that some people claim!

                      Low Nitrates (zero)= deficiency= declining plant health= declining color pigmentation

                      nothing IN MY EXPERIENCE shows or proves that low nitrates or high Fe leads to higher reds. The only Factor from my experience that noticeably changes color pigmentation was light and Co2.

                      Ive kept "red" plants in both high and low nitrate and Fe situations without much of a noticeable change in color pigmentation.

                      Now i don't read much of the forums these days, usually just early in the morning before i go out . So I don't know what people are claiming.

                      All i know is my plants don't lie, if somethings up my plants or fish will tell me before a test kit or forum will!

                      so before you attack me telling me that this fertilizer causes this color change or whatever. My claims are the results from my experiences keeping aquatic plants you might have a different opinion and i respect that!

                      however from my experiences: as long as Light and Co2 were consistent the Color would be consistent too.

                      I originally say when nitrates are too low because it your at the rate of a deficiency color WILL be affected

                      Originally posted by Gerryd View Post
                      Since the same top is replanted several times, perhaps the maturity/size plays a role in color?
                      I think you might be on to something here, I definitely notice a change in growth pattern for my mature echinodorus plants vs. juvis however i have not put much consideration to such a factor Maybe post some pics when you replant and elaborate on your thesis?
                      Last edited by jazzlvr123; 08-29-2009, 06:56 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jazzlvr123 View Post
                        so before you attack me telling me that this fertilizer causes this color change or whatever. My claims are the results from my experiences keeping aquatic plants you might have a different opinion and i respect that!
                        Wow, that's quite the response!! I don't think s/he was attacking you...quite the contrary! You don't have to agree with someone else's suggestions.
                        90g mixed reef
                        20g planted Atasuki trophy tank

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                        • #13
                          I've gotten red out of high nitrates under <1wpg of T8 in R. rotundifolia and no CO2. It then turned green and is now creeping and growing almost like a screwed up rosette with otherwise very healthy growth. I have absolutely no clue why. I've gotten awkward bronze at 3wpg with low-ish nitrates and CO2 high enough to spend most mornings wondering if the fish are dead yet. Red doesn't happen under any set conditions that I have observed so far.

                          I've heard absolute nitrate crashes combined with good CO2 can provide this. I don't have a hard time believing it either. I'm not sure it'd work long term though, given variances between carotenoid paths and plant physiology. What do you do with a plant that will take up NO3 through its roots in a substrate? What do you do with a crypt that keeps a large nutrient supply back?

                          Would you keep a LTK cichlid in 6pH and expect it to spawn because your convict cichlids did?

                          I think this is one of those issues that honestly doesn't have a clear answer within the hobby yet, when it comes to achieving long-term, stable redness. It's so speculative that it quickly degrades in to shouting matches when I've brought it up on #ptchat.

                          For now, I'm happy with reading about it until something starts to sound reasonable; I've been screwing with my parameters enough lately. The closest I'm getting is spectrum color in some cyanobacteria, but it's too early for me to say anything is remotely conclusive.

                          -Philosophos
                          - Dan

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                          • #14
                            Stable Carbon supply to the plant is part of the issue also.
                            Non CO2 planted tanks seem to manage to get very nice reds as well, once established.

                            Light will certainly drive the rates of growth faster, this means less time for Chl a to be formed in the new tips, also, as the tip growth gets closer to the lights, it has more intensity/higher PAR, the plant used the red color to protect from herbivores, UV light(not an issue for us however) and are among the first pigments in new tissue.

                            With slow rates of growth, we still have good color however.

                            It's hard to say why really.
                            Stable conditions, healthy general growth has always seemed best.

                            Good CO2 if you use it, good light etc.

                            I have some really deep coloration for this plant at 1.8w/gal, good CO2, ADA AS, EI dosing etc.

                            I've spent a lot of time fiddling with trying to keep and maintain a very low NO3 residual. Some found this a good way to induce it for a show, etc, but few seem to keep doing it say for "years",. most forget about it after a few bottoming out of the NO3 events.

                            They learn and stop.

                            Another way is using soil or ADA AS etc, and not add much light and not add much water column ferts. Plants still have plenty of N however. Over time, the reds will pop out as the N levels go down, but this is also when BGA appears also.

                            There's always a trade off.
                            There are many species of nice red plants to pick and chose from so I just focus on that and good general growth for all plants, not just red ones.

                            More Red seems to be a stress, not something that suggest healthier plants.

                            Regards,
                            Tom Barr
                            www.BarrReport.com

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