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  • #46
    Originally posted by Tom Barr View Post

    Many studies support the CO2 compensation points for algae are in the 0.1ppm ranges for the higher green freshwater algae species. Here is a review of 16 freshwater species:

    Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Compensation Points of Freshwater Algae -- Birmingham and Colman 64 (5): 892 -- PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
    Hi Tom,

    correct me if I am wrong.
    1 microliter ( μL ) per liter = 1 ppm, reference: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ppm-d_1039.html
    right?

    So, the CO2 compensation points of 16 freshwater algae ranged from 4.8-41.5 microliters per liter (or 4.8-41.5 ppm) at acid pH,
    while at alkaline pH they ranged from 0.2 to 7.2 microliters per liter (or 0.2-7.2 ppm).

    Obviously algae adapted easily to the alkaline environment. But in the acid environment, I am not sure if algae are doing any better than the aquatic plants? How do we rule out that it is CO2 ALONG that control the algae bloom but not the accompanied acid environment?

    Regards,
    Erich

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    • #47
      Originally posted by paludarium View Post
      Hi Tom,

      correct me if I am wrong.
      1 microliter ( μL ) per liter = 1 ppm, reference: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ppm-d_1039.html
      right?

      So, the CO2 compensation points of 16 freshwater algae ranged from 4.8-41.5 microliters per liter (or 4.8-41.5 ppm) at acid pH,
      while at alkaline pH they ranged from 0.2 to 7.2 microliters per liter (or 0.2-7.2 ppm).

      Obviously algae adapted easily to the alkaline environment. But in the acid environment, I am not sure if algae are doing any better than the aquatic plants? How do we rule out that it is CO2 ALONG that control the algae bloom but not the accompanied acid environment?

      Regards,
      Erich

      you simply use an acid/base system that does not use CO2/HCO3, then see what effects the pH has...........in the acid ranges.......peat,. tannins often do this in natural systems, so that would be one idea.........then other acids and base pairs can be used also.

      Then the CO2 can be controlled independently and then deterime if there is much effect on growth, algae, plants etc.......
      www.BarrReport.com

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Tom Barr View Post
        you simply use an acid/base system that does not use CO2/HCO3, then see what effects the pH has...........in the acid ranges.......peat,. tannins often do this in natural systems, so that would be one idea.........then other acids and base pairs can be used also.

        Then the CO2 can be controlled independently and then deterime if there is much effect on growth, algae, plants etc.......
        Thanks Tom.

        Aside from algae, according to this study on three aquatic weeds, http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/58/6/761.full.pdf, Hydrilla and Ceratophyllum had CO2 compensation points of 44 and 41 microliters per liter, respectively, whereas the value for Myriophyllum was 19. Most of the algae lay in the range of 15 to 20 microliters per liter. http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/64/5/892.short.

        In terms of CO2 compensation points, is Myriophyllum spicatum a more competitive species, but not Hydrilla or Ceratophyllum?

        Regards,
        Erich

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by paludarium View Post
          Thanks Tom.

          Aside from algae, according to this study on three aquatic weeds, http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/58/6/761.full.pdf, Hydrilla and Ceratophyllum had CO2 compensation points of 44 and 41 microliters per liter, respectively, whereas the value for Myriophyllum was 19. Most of the algae lay in the range of 15 to 20 microliters per liter. http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/64/5/892.short.

          In terms of CO2 compensation points, is Myriophyllum spicatum a more competitive species, but not Hydrilla or Ceratophyllum?

          Regards,
          Erich
          Look at Figure 6, this is the most telling figure that all the other info has led up to.

          As light starts from say 0-100umol, which weed is photosynthesizing the fastest? Eg, taking up the most CO2?

          Hydrilla.

          It just kicks the other species' butt when it comes to using up CO2 and growing with much less light.
          Eurasian milfoil and coontail both have VERY similar curves, and we find them growing together often in CA.
          Both at 0ft elevation and at 7000ft.

          Hydrilla, if present, will quickly bury any and all other plants except perhaps floaters like Hyacinth, but even these two will die back and lose due to removal of nutrients in the water column by Hydrilla.

          It's an evil weed indeed.

          Also, in the CO2 compensation, you need to look at GO activity...........this means that milfoil is poor at photorespiration efficacy, Hydrilla? again, it kicks butt.

          Notice that corn, a C4 plant also have a very low GO activity level.........Hydrilla has C4 like metabolism lacking the spatial Kranz anatomy.
          That was a later paper from Bowes.
          www.BarrReport.com

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